LINK team carries out rainwater harvesting field research in Eastern Kenya

Farmers in Kenya’s drylands use numerous techniques and technologies to capture the scant water that falls during rainy seasons.  Rainwater harvesting (RWH) technologies, which range from simple to complex — and inexpensive to very expensive — also vary in effectiveness and optimal use.  In order to make smart decisions about financing and implementing RWH structures, it is important to know not just their technical specifications and expected water capacity, but also their return on investment (ROI) on the ground.  At present, this data is largely unavailable. LINK (Learning and Innovation Network for Knowledge and Solutions) winner Dr. Kennedy Mwetu of Kenyatta University (KU) had a number of questions that he knew needed to be answered in order for farmers, financiers, and implementing organizations to make better decisions on RWH: How quickly can a farmer reach ROI in a “farm pond,”?  How does ROI differ for a large, community-owned “sand dam”? What combination of crops and other inputs make for optimal ROI?  Mwetu, a team of researchers and graduate students from KU, and partners from World Agroforestry Center (ICRAF) in Nairobi set out in late October 2013 to identify empirical data suggesting answers to these and other questions. Their ultimate goal was to identify viable business models for RWH, and free up financing for the most effective, scalable technologies. […]

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Improving the lives of rural Kenyan women through improved water access

After years of off-and-on droughts and with the specter of continued climate change looming, Kenya faces an enormous challenge in providing access to water to its citizens.  Many rural and poor urban communities do not have access to clean, safe water.  One reason for this: large parts of the country are arid or semi-arid, and only 9.7% of the land is considered arable. Only 54% of rural Kenyans—many of whom live in the drylands—have access to an improved water source, while 84% of urban Kenyans enjoy access to an improved water source. Although water scarcity affects Kenyans across gender and socioeconomic divisions, water scarcity uniquely harms women and girls.   Women and girls bear the burden of looking for water sources for their families, walking long distances to often find only unclean and unsafe water.  In the drylands, especially during droughts, the time that women and girls spend gathering water crowds out time available for education, starting businesses, and other activities that can improve their and their families’ lives.  For girls who are fortunate enough to attend school regularly, a lack of clean water and efficient latrines in schools make it difficult for girls to use the facilities, especially during their menstrual period.  Such unsanitary conditions cause these girls to miss school and may increase the probability of their leaving school early. Women and girls also put their health at risk when fetching water that is contaminated with parasites.  To make matters worse, their families contract water-borne diseases like cholera, dysentery, typhoid and diarrhea from consuming this water.  In families already suffering from poverty, a serious illness can mean that children (particularly girls) must drop out of school to take care of sick family members or work to support their families.   […]

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Kenya Stakeholder Dialogue on Water Harvesting: See After-Action Report Here

In January, a group of us from GKI were in Kenya with Dr. Kennedy Mwetu and the LINK Kenya team. The trip was exciting for a number of reasons, including having the chance to visit farmers in Kitui County, and sign a Memorandum of Understanding with Kenyatta University. One of the most important parts of the trip, though, was a dialogue and workshop on rainwater harvesting hosted by GKI and Kenyatta University on January 16. Thirty-one stakeholders from Kenya’s government, non-profit, and university communities came together to identify ways to boost farmer incomes through rainwater harvesting. We have a long way to go, but we at GKI believe that the partnerships forged at this event have the capacity to be catalytic, and change the direction of water scarcity interventions in Kenya. Read the recently released International Stakeholder Dialogue and Workshop on Water Harvesting in Kenya’s Arid and Sem-Arid Lands (PDF). […]

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