Meet our two new interns: Srujana Penumetcha & Colin Huerter

We our happy to welcome our two newest interns, Srujana Penumetcha and Colin Huerter. Both will be joining us as international program interns, and both are about to begin the second year of their Master of Public Policy degrees at the Georgetown Public Policy Institute. We will put their bios on the GKI website soon, but in the meantime we thought we would ask them a few questions about themselves as a means of introducing them. They are both smart, well-read, and are appropriately enthusiastic about coffee. Srujana Penumetcha: 1. What motivated you to get involved in international development? “I first became interested in international development through my work with Amnesty International as an undergraduate. Having learned about various human rights issues and development challenges, I found myself searching for ways to make a more direct impact. My interest in international relations and eagerness to learn more about economic development and poverty alleviation led me to focus my senior independent study on conditional cash transfer programs in India. This helped pave the way for my involvement in international development.” 2. What has been your favorite graduate school class thus far (in your first year), and why? “My favorite class in graduate school so far has been Development and Foreign Assistance, which was taught by Professor Steven Radelet. It was a comprehensive study of the role of foreign assistance in economic development and provided a foundation to think critically about the complex and inherent problems of the aid industry. The class was highly engaging and gave me an opportunity to learn more about the current debates on foreign assistance and aid reforms.” 3. What is the best development/policy related book or article that you have read recently, and what did you like about it? “One of the best development policy related books I recently read is┬áThe Bottom Billion┬áby Paul Collier. It offers important insights and analysis of the underlying causes of poverty and focuses on the often overlooked group of small […]

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